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After the Hurricane Harvey, at a Houston complex, a construction work is being carried out. It’s during October in Texas the construction job. It’s during October Texas started hiring that bounced significantly after a Hurricane Harvey-induced drop in employment, in September as the state employment was dragged down to a record low level. This was reported by the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas on Friday.
It’s in October Texas integrated a shrieking 63,400 jobs, mostly because of 22,900 jobs gain in the area of Houston and it continued a strong employment growth along the 35 corridor interstate from San Antonio to Fort Worth/Dallas.
The unemployment rate of Texas submerged to 3.9% that’s a record low. The unemployment rate of the state has never been such below 4% since the beginning of the state-wide record of Federal Reserve in January 1976.
Meanwhile, the San Antonio area continued its way of bit quicker hiring process by adding up to 3,000 jobs in the month of October, lying on a track of job growth of 3%, compared to the forecast of the state of about 2.6% growth this year. Back previous year in 2016 the jobs of Texas only grew to 1.2%, but till date this year has witnessed jobs grow at a rate of 2.7 percent.
The strong market for the job has made hiring as a challenge for the employers in the area of San Antonio.
The president of Tri-Starr staffing agency in San Antonio, and CEO, Kandace Hawkins said that search for qualified talents stays as their biggest challenge and all of the skilled individuals are in high demand. So they have to travel to other cities in Texas and also outside of it for finding qualified people in the field of IT, particularly in the space of software development, which was also said by Hawkins.
Hawkins also added that the customer service business is proceeding quite well and so they are having quite difficult time in finding to hire qualified people for the accounting post. After losing a lump sum amount of 8,400 jobs in September, Houston integrated 10,600 jobs in October, as per data of Dallas Fed.